OJEpi  Vol.2 No.2 , May 2012
Comparison of coffee, tea and green tea consumption between Japanese with and without metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study
ABSTRACT
There are some reports that coffee consumption improves insulin resistance. Therefore, we investigated the link between metabolic syndrome and coffee, tea and green tea consumption in Japanese. We used data of 150 men and 227 women who were not taking any medications, aged 22 - 74 years, in this cross-sectional investigation study. Habitual coffee, tea and green tea consumption was defined as drinking one or more cups of coffee, tea and green tea per day. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was based on the Japanese criteria. In subjects without medications, 34 men (22.7%) and 10 women (4.4%) were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Coffee and green tea consumption was weakly and positively correlated with age in women. Significant differences of coffee consumption between women with and without abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension, tea consumption between men with and without dyslipidemia were noted after adjusting for age. However, there were no significant differences of other consumption between subjects with and without metabolic syndrome in both sexes. Among Japanese not taking medications, coffee, tea and green tea consumption was not clearly associated with metabolic syndrome in the Japanese population.

Cite this paper
Miyatake, N. , Sakano, N. and Numata, T. (2012) Comparison of coffee, tea and green tea consumption between Japanese with and without metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study. Open Journal of Epidemiology, 2, 44-49. doi: 10.4236/ojepi.2012.22007.
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