OJOG  Vol.2 No.1 , March 2012
Prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases in pregnant women in Ikot Ekpene, a rural community in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria
ABSTRACT
Background: Sexually transmitted diseases are associated with adverse consequences in pregnancy and its outcome. However, early detections and effective treatments would prevent the associated complications. Objectives: The main aims of this study are to determine the prevalence of common sexually transmitted diseases and to assess the socio-demographic profile of the women. Subjects and Methods: Samples were collected from 560 pregnant women at the first antenatal visit in the hospital after they were counseled and informed consent obtained. Pre-tested questionnaires were used to assess their socio-economic and demographic characteristics. The samples were subjected to the relevant laboratory tests and analysis. Results: Out of the 562 pregnant women examined, 250 (44.5%) were infected with various etiologic agents. Genital candidasis was the highest infection encountered in 119 (21.1%) women followed by Bacterial vaginosis in 38 (6.8%) and Chalamydiae in 35 (6.2%). Others infections included Hepatitis 8 (1.4%); Trichomonasis 29 (5.2%); Human immunodeficiency virus infection 12 (2.1%), Syphilis 7 (1.2%) and 2 Gonococcal infections respectively. The mean parity of the women with infection was 3 ± 1.4 and majority was asymptomatic (57.1%). The prevalence rate of infection was inversely associated with increasing maternal age and advanced formal educational status. The mean gestational age was 19 weeks ± 4.2 and appeared highest with earlier gestational age. Conclusion: There is high prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases among our pregnant women with most of them being asymptomatic. Screening for and prophylactic treatment of the common treatable infection at booking may reduce the incidence of adverse maternal and perinatal outcome associated with these infections.

Cite this paper
Inyang Ekanem, E. , Ekott, M. , Edet Udo, A. , Eyo Efiok, E. and Inyang-Out, A. (2012) Prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases in pregnant women in Ikot Ekpene, a rural community in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2, 49-55. doi: 10.4236/ojog.2012.21009.
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