JSEA  Vol.5 No.3 , March 2012
Research on SAP Business One Implementation Risk Factors with Interpretive Structural Model
ABSTRACT
The possible risk factors during SAP Business One implementation were studied with depth interview. The results are then adjusted by experts. 20 categories of risk factors that are totally 49 factors were found. Based on the risk factors during the SAP Business One implementation, questionnaire was used to study the key risk factors of SAP Business One implementation. Results illustrate ten key risk factors, these are risk of senior managers leadership, risk of project management, risk of process improvement, risk of implementation team organization, risk of process analysis, risk of based data, risk of personnel coordination, risk of change management, risk of secondary development, and risk of data import. Focus on the key risks of SAP Business One implementation, the interpretative structural modeling approach is used to study the relationship between these factors and establish a seven-level hierarchical structure. The study illustrates that the structure is olive-like, in which the risk of data import is on the top, and the risk of senior managers is on the bottom. They are the most important risk factors.

Cite this paper
J. Wan and J. Hou, "Research on SAP Business One Implementation Risk Factors with Interpretive Structural Model," Journal of Software Engineering and Applications, Vol. 5 No. 3, 2012, pp. 147-155. doi: 10.4236/jsea.2012.53022.
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