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Biography
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Prof. Akbar Nikkhah

Faculty of Agricultural Sciences

University of Zanjan, Iran

Professor


Email: anikkha@yahoo.com


Qualifications

2008 Post-Doctorate, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA, Nutritional Physiology, Biochemistry, and Genomics

2007 PH.D., University of Manitoba, Canada, Nutritional Physiology

2001 M.Sc., Isfahan University of Technology, Iran, Animal Nutrition

1999 B.Sc., University of Zanjan, Iran, Animal Sciences, Agricultural Engineering


Publications (Selected)

  1. Nikkhah, A. 2012. Eating Time Modulations of Physiology and Health: Life Lessons from Human and Ruminant Models. Ir. J. Bas. Med. Sci. 15(4): 891-899.
  2. Nikkhah, A. 2012. Barley grain for ruminants: a global treasure or tragedy. J. Anim. Sci. Biotechnol. 3: 22-30. http://www.jasbsci.com/content/3/1/22.
  3. Nikkhah, A. 2012. Peripheral Lactate Rhythmicity in Evening and Morning Fed Dairy Cows: A Chronophysiological Lactating Model. Biol. Rhythm Res. DOI: 10.1080/09291016.2011.652860.
  4. Nikkhah, A. 2012. Timing of eating for dairy cows: rumen metabolism, nutrient digestibility, nitrogen partitioning and milk fatty acids profiles. Livestock Science. In revision.
  5. Nikkhah, A. 2012. Equidae Milk Promises Substitutes for Cow and Breast Milks. Turk. J. Vet. Anim. Adv. doi: 10.3906/vet-1105-10.
  6. Nikkhah, A. 2012. Barley forages for modern ruminant agriculture: a global review. Russian Agricultural Science. Accepted, June 2012.
  7. Nikkhah, A. 2012. Chronophysiology of ruminant feeding behavior and metabolism: an evolutionary review. Biol. Rhythm Res. DOI: 10.1080/09291016.2012.656437.
  8. Nikkhah, A. 2011. A biofarm technology to monitor and quantify oestrus cervix morphology in commercial dairy herds. Adv. Biosci. Biotechnol. 2: 424-428.
  9. Nikkhah, A., R. Kowsar. 2011. Seasonal Holstein cow behavior in large yards revealed. Turk. J. Vet. Anim. Adv. 2012; 36(2): 123-129. doi: 10.3906/vet-1012-626.
  10. Nikkhah, A. F. Amiri, H. Amanlou. 2012. Ground wheat grain in dairy rations: challenging a common wisdom. The Scientific World Journal. doi: 10.1100/2012/247941.
  11. Nikkhah, A., C. Furedi, A. Kennedy, K. Wittenberg, J.C. Plaizier. 2010. Feed delivery at 2100 h vs. 0900 h for lactating dairy cows. Can. J. Anim. Sci. 91(1): 113-122.
  12. Nikkhah, A. 2011. Animal Chronophysiological Management: An Emerging Bioscience. Open Access Animal Physiology. 3: 9-12.
  13. Nikkhah, A. 2011. Milk Products and Postmodern Humans: Public Education Fundamentals. Food and Nutrition Sciences, 2: 222-224.
  14. Nikkhah, A. 2010. Postmodern Academic Science Education: Mentorship Arts. Int. J. Acad. Res. Bus. Soc. Sci. 1(1): 102-105.
  15. Nikkhah, A. 2011. Milk of Sheep, Goats, and Buffalos: A Public Health Review. Int. J. Food Safety, Nutrition & Public Health. 4: 264-276.
  16. Nikkhah, A. 2011. Eating time: an evolutionary manager of postmodern rumen physiology and health: a review. Open Access Animal Physiology. 3: 13-19.
  17. Nikkhah, A. 2011. Equidae, Camel and Yak Milks as Functional Foods: A Review. Life Sciences. J. Nutr. Food Sci. 1:116. doi: 10.4172/2155-9600.1000116.
  18. Nikkhah, A. 2011. Science of eating time: A novel chronophysiological approach to optimize glucose-insulin dynamics and health. J. Diabetes Mellitus 2(1): 8-11.
  19. Nikkhah, A. 2011. Postprandial and 24-h rhythms of peripheral urea in evening and morning fed lactating dairy cows on high and low concentrate diets. Veterinary Science Research. 2: 13-16.
  20. Nikkhah, A. 2011. Eating timing regulates of feeding patterns of rumen ammonia and blood urea: a dairy cow model. Veterinary Science Research. 2: 17-20.


Last Updated: August, 2012