AHS  Vol.7 No.3 , September 2018
Russian Science Prior to the Russian Revolution
ABSTRACT
This paper is an attempt to present and discuss the scientific context prior to the outbreak of the Russian Revolution in 1917. Some general aspects of the scientific milieus of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries are described, including the period of Peter the Great, the foundation of the Academy of Science, and the influence of great figures of science, both Russian and foreign. In the eighteenth century, Euler (1707-1783) and Lomonosov (1711-1765) were chosen as symbolic and representative figures, while in the nineteenth century, Lobachevski (1792-1856), Chebyshev (1821-1894), Mendeleev (1834-1907), and Pavlov (1849-1936) were looked.
Cite this paper
Oliveira, A. (2018) Russian Science Prior to the Russian Revolution. Advances in Historical Studies, 7, 113-134. doi: 10.4236/ahs.2018.73008.
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