OJOG  Vol.8 No.1 , January 2018
Comparison between Forceps, Single Blade Forceps and Manual Extraction of Fetal Head in Elective Caesarean Section: A Randomized Control Trial—Forceps Delivery in Cesarean Section
ABSTRACT
Objective: The fundal pressure exerted by the assistant to deliver fetal head is often painful to the patient. This study assesses the use of double blade forceps in delivery of fetal head at time of elective Cesarean Section (CS). Methods: A prospective single-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted among 150 women with repeat elective CS at Ain Shams university hospital, Air Force Specialized hospital and October 6th university hospital. Women were classified into 3 groups (each 50 women). Forceps group: A double blade of forceps was used without fundal pressure. Single blade group: single blade of forceps was used assisted by fundal pressure. Manual group: manual extraction was used assisted by fundal pressure. The outcome of study were; Pain expectation score , pain score during delivery of head, unintended uterine extension, uterine vessels injury and need for additional stitches. The collected data were statistically analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: High Statistically significant difference in pain score during delivery of head in favor of forceps group (P = 0.001). No differences were found among 3 groups as regarding pain expectation, uterine extension, uterine vessel injury and in need of haemostatic stitches (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Use of double blade forceps is less painful for the patients during delivery of head in CS.
Cite this paper
Wahab, A. and Abolouz, A. (2018) Comparison between Forceps, Single Blade Forceps and Manual Extraction of Fetal Head in Elective Caesarean Section: A Randomized Control Trial—Forceps Delivery in Cesarean Section. Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 8, 31-38. doi: 10.4236/ojog.2018.81004.
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