JSEMAT  Vol.3 No.1 A , February 2013
Carbonation Resistance and Anticorrosive Properties of Organic Coatings for Concrete Structures
ABSTRACT

The present study examines the behavior of three major categories of organic coatings which are applied on the surface of concrete structures and specifically conventional, high performance and nanotechnology paint systems. The comparison is achieved in the means of anticorrosion properties under the presence of chloride ions and carbonation resistance. The evaluation methods included electrochemical measurements in order to assess corrosion properties and the determination of steel’s mass loss after the end of the experimental procedure. Carbonation depth was measured using phenolphthalein as indicator after accelerated and physical exposure. From the results so far it can be shown nanocoatings gave promising results regarding induced chloride ion corrosion.


Cite this paper
T. Zafeiropoulou, E. Rakanta and G. Batis, "Carbonation Resistance and Anticorrosive Properties of Organic Coatings for Concrete Structures," Journal of Surface Engineered Materials and Advanced Technology, Vol. 3 No. 1, 2013, pp. 67-74. doi: 10.4236/jsemat.2013.31A010.
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